wall works

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Wallworks refer to the studio process and resulting objects of using found, readymade versions of landscapes that are pastoral, recipedic and commonplace. Said landscapes are then layered with line marker schematics/paint to propose various notions.

 

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Western Scenic Views (CENSURE SERIES), 2013, line marker on billboard, 120″ x 264″

In the CENSURE SERIES, found, collected images presenting pastoral landscapes are brushed over with line marker black to varying degrees of obliteration.  As line marker’s ‘paint eraser’, black is used to omit or cancel existing language on the road; here within these formulaic pictures-of-place their design is erased or partially erased. A billboard circa 1940 links the pastoral as a means of discovery through the automobile.

 

 

 

 

 

 

10CW2011 AND AFTER A WHILEand after a while the ground became the vista and vice versa – just the way a good opinion forms and after a while the opinion became the vista and vice versa – just the way a good ground forms…, 2011, line marker on wallpaper, 96″ x 152″

 

 

 

 

 

wells4parcel the journey with the destination: photogene, 2010, line marker on wallpaper, 100” x 220”

A second work contrasting the pastoral landscape of Northern Ontario with the line marker as journey wayfinder. The photogene or ‘afterimage’ exampled by the repetitive tree visually ‘competes’ with the line marker, ending in a black void panel.

 

 

 

 

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Mind’s Eye (Slumber), 1971, Chevrolet Kingswood Estate, 2008, line marker on wallpaper, 96” x 54”

 

 The line marker is juxtaposed with a pastoral image of the Niagara River. The image, turned counter-clockwise imagines the family trip during childhood and a specific perception of moving through a landscape.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

02.parcel the journey

parcel the journey with the destination2002, line marker on wallpaper, 110″ x 96″

The inaugural work in the series, the line marker as an environmental signifier versus the Northern landscape, the pastoral and the Canadian Art tradition of said imagery (Group of Seven) is explored.

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